Docker Enterprise now runs Windows and Linux in one cluster

With the newest Docker Enterprise Edition, you can now have Docker clusters composed of nodes running different operating systems.

Three of the key OSes supported by Docker—Windows, Linux, and IBM System Z—can run applications side by side in the same cluster, all orchestrated by a common mechanism.

Clustering apps across multiple OSes in Docker requires that you build per-OS images for each app. But those apps, when running on both Windows and Linux, can be linked to run in concert via Docker’s overlay networking.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Windows Server OS runs on ARM, with help from Qualcomm

Microsoft has warmed up to Qualcomm to make a Windows 10 PC based on its ARM chip, and now the companies are bringing Windows Server OS to ARM.

For the first time ever, Microsoft is expected to show the Windows Server OS running on an ARM server. The server runs on Qualcomm’s Centriq 2400, an ARM-based chip designed for cloud servers.

The server is being shown at the Open Project Compute Summit being held in Santa Clara, California, on Wednesday and Thursday.The ARM-based Windows Server hardware is for Microsoft’s internal use. No information was shared on when Windows Server would be available for ARM servers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Kubernetes rounds out Azure options, paves way for Windows Server Containers

Google’s Kubernetes container management system is now generally available for users of Microsoft’s Azure Container Service.

ACS support is one of a set of changes Microsoft is rolling out to broaden Azure’s container management options to be more open-ended and competitive. In a blog post, Microsoft proclaimed Azure “the only public cloud platform that provides a container service with the choice of the three most popular open source orchestrators available today.”

Bringing the power to all

Microsoft emphasized “choice” when it originally introduced Azure Container Service. Although it launched without Kubernetes, Azure initially supported Mesosphere DC/OS and Docker Swarm because the majority of Microsoft’s customers used them and the company believed they would be well served by the support.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

A Windows Cloud build just leaked, and this is what we learned

Microsoft’s mysterious Windows Cloud is supposedly a stripped-down version of Microsoft’s operating system that runs only Windows Store apps. Microsoft’s not commenting, but an early build that leaked over the weekend appears to be authentic and gives further tantalizing hints of what the company may have in mind. 

Windows Cloud intrigues Microsoft watchers because of its uncanny resemblance to Windows RT, Microsoft’s failed ARM-based platform. It, too, could only run Windows Store apps, plus desktop versions of Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office. There are numerous reasons why RT never succeeded, but the gist is there weren’t enough apps and nobody wanted to run a hobbled PC.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s mysterious ‘Windows Cloud’ could be the second coming of Windows RT

Windows Cloud: That name has appeared in system files deep within some of the most recent Windows 10 Insider builds. While a few experts guess it could be a new version of Windows, what it actually is remains a mystery. 

As far as evidence goes, it’s pretty slim pickings. Two names, “Windows Cloud” and “Windows Cloud N,” appear in a list of Windows versions as early as the recent Windows 10 Insider Build 15002, as originally reported by the Walking Cat Twitter account. (The “N” designation likely refers to a version specifically designed for European countries.)

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: How to install openSUSE Leap bash shell in Windows 10

It’s no longer a Windows vs Linux world. It’s a Windows and Linux World. And when it comes to the cloud, Linux rules.

That creates a unique challenge for Microsoft. Windows doesn’t have tools and utilities to manage Linux servers. This has meant that developers running Windows on their local machines have had to either dual boot with Linux or run Linux in a virtual machine (VM). Neither was an ideal situation.

Microsoft tried to bring Linux capabilities to PowerShell, but that was going to be a daunting task, so they came up with a clever solution. They created a subsystem for Linux so admins and developers can run Linux utilities natively on Windows without having the overhead of a VM and without leaving the Windows environment, which means they can develop and deploy for both platforms.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

This is the first in a weekey series I’m calling ‘weekly roundup’ in which I will highlight some of the hottest stories of the week from the world of Linux and open source. This week, I want to call your attention to some excciting Windows 10/openSUSE news and alert you to a backdoor vulnerability in WhatsApp that allows messages to be intercepted.

Replace Ubuntu with openSUSE in Bash on Windows 10

If you are a Windows 10 user who also dual boots with openSUSE, I have some good news for you. You don’t have to dual boot or increase system overload with a virtual machine. You can now run most, if not all, openSUSE tools within Windows 10.

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CIO Cloud Computing

The cloud will absorb Windows (and the rest)

InfoWorld’s Eric Knorr has made the compelling point that perhaps Microsoft should get out of the Windows business and instead focus on the public cloud. I get that opinion. In the 1990s, I reviewed client operating systems that included Windows 95, Windows NT, OS/2, and about a dozen versions of Unix. In the back of my mind, I thought that was a fool’s errand, that we were focused on the wrong problem.

The past focus on client operating systems, then on mobile operating systems, was perhaps a misplaced effort. Why? For one thing, the complexity of it all — if you support client operating systems, you’re distributing complexity. Ask the people charged with supporting Windows — or any client OS, for that matter. They will most likely tell you that the complexity and difficulty is large.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Windows? Linux? The OS is dead, killed by the cloud

Remember when operating systems mattered? Those halcyon days when Windows and Linux gearheads eviscerated each other in the comments sections of blogs?

Well, it’s time to get over the OS. It doesn’t matter anymore.

This will sound strange to the server-hugging rearguard, but to anyone who has spent time in the cloud, it will feel familiar. Tim Bray, one-time Googler and currently with Amazon Web Services, acknowledges that “way too many people are still configuring operating systems,” but insists that Lambda, inspired by AWS but “now from all the Cloud heavyweights,” has established “the natural unit of computation [as] a function, which runs in response to an ‘event’.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Windows 10 Enterprise Adoption Will Soar By 2017, Gartner Finds

Gartner is predicting the swift and broad enterprise adoption of Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system, thanks in part to pent-up demand for tablets. This is following similar patterns by Windows XP and Windows 7.
InformationWeek: Cloud