DataStax wants to manage Apache Cassandra anywhere

In the early days of the cloud, a decade or so ago, the conversations were generally parsed in terms of it being a zero-sum game. Either the cloud would win or on-premises would. Either public cloud would crush private cloud or the other way round. And if the public cloud were to win, then it would be a fight to the death between Google, Microsoft and Amazon.

But we’ve all gotten a little more nuanced since then, and most people accept that some kind of hybrid offering will likely be the default for the vast majority of organizations into the future. With a few exception, most organizations will take a little bit of this, add it to a little bit of that, and throw in some of that stuff for good measure.

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Network World Cloud Computing

SAP wants enterprises to learn from their smart devices

SAP has added machine learning to its Leonardo IoT software suite to help businesses handle data gathered from smart devices more intelligently.

It unveiled the additions to Leonardo  — and a cloud of other news — at its customer conference, Sapphire Now, in Orlando on Tuesday.

Leonardo runs on SAP Cloud Platform and provides a number of services to process data from the internet of things, including streaming and predictive analytics. Now, those predictive capabilities will include machine-learning tools tuned to work with the rest of the Leonardo components.

“It’s about adding intelligence to existing business processes and integrating with the core systems of record. Leonardo’s capabilities can be infused into SAP applications,” said Mike Flannagan, SAP’s senior vice president for analytics. “We see Leonardo as something that will help customers transform processes.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: RackWare, like everyone, wants to manage hybrid clouds everywhere

RackWare offers a management and automation platform that enterprises use to manage their computing resources to more closely follow demand. RackWare’s core proposition is that its management suite delivers cost savings to customers of a suggested 40 to 50 percent. Additionally, RackWare promises to deliver the highest levels of performance and availability to their customers.

The company today released a new take on its management suite that aims to extend the existing core RackWare offering. The new platform promises to offer enterprises a single solution (they refrained from calling it a single pane of glass) to move applications, protect those same applications and manage all the different applications across the totality of their infrastructure. Justifying the move, RackWare points to a recent IDC report that suggests 70 percent of heavy cloud users are considering a hybrid cloud strategy.

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Network World Cloud

How IBM wants to bring blockchain from Bitcoin to your data center

At its InterConnect conference in Las Vegas this week, IBM is announcing new features for its open source cloud-hosted blockchain service in an attempt to bring this distributed database technology from its initial use of powering Bitcoin to a broader market, including the financial services industry.

Blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continually growing list of records that can be verified using hashing techniques. Vendors such as IBM and Microsoft are attempting to commercialize it by offering customers a platform for hosting their own implementations. Analysts say the market to do so is just emerging.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: The future of networking is in a white box | How to get the most out of data and services in a multi-cloud world +

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CIO Cloud Computing

How Cisco wants to become the Switzerland of the cloud

After years of juggling with different strategies of how to pursue the cloud computing market, Cisco now has what it believes will be a winning one: Become a so-called Switzerland of the cloud.

Cisco is not spending billions of dollars to build a public cloud to compete with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform. “That ship has sailed,” says Fabio Gori, head of cloud marketing at Cisco.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Cloud comparison Amazon Web Services vs. Microsoft Azure vs. Google Cloud Platform +

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CIO Cloud Computing

AWS wants to dominate beyond the public cloud with Lambda updates

Amazon Web Services’ big Re:Invent conference in Las Vegas brought a plethora of new features and upgrades to its cloud platform. But there was one key set of upgrades that set the stage for Amazon’s expansion outside its own public cloud data centers.

Two years ago, AWS CEO Andy Jassy made a big splash at Re:Invent when he introduced Lambda, a service that lets developers write snippets of code that execute in response to event triggers. Amazon does the work to provision servers to run that code, so developers don’t have to think about the infrastructure overhead.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Uh-oh: The NSA wants in on IoT

When asked whether the internet of things would be a boon for the NSA or merely a whole lot of digital noise to sift through, NSA deputy director Richard Ledgett replied, “Both.”

Should we be worried?

I can see the temptation IoT provides the NSA (and other governments’ spies). I mean, we voluntarily carry devices that can be both hacked and tracked. However, I’m sure that no one — not even the NSA — is interested in how much sleep I got last night or the fact that my steps consisted of those from the TV to the refrigerator.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: ZipBooks wants to shake up the accounting software market by helping customers collect cash

The accounting software industry is, contrary to what you might think, a pretty interesting place. Characterized by three large vendors that hold the lion’s share of the market in their respective geographies, until recently it has been a fairly sedentary place with Intuit (U.S.), Sage (U.K.) and MYOB (Australasia) happy to organically grow their businesses. That all changed around 10 years ago when Xero, a New Zealand-based startup, came on the scene and started taking well-aimed kicks at the three sleeping bears.

Since then, Xero has gone on to take significant market share in its home market of Australasia, pretty positive market share in the U.K., and is trying its hardest against a newly invigorated competitor to gain a toehold in the all-important U.S. market. That isn’t proving quite as easy as in Australasia and the U.K., due to some structural and competitive issues and also due to the fact that Intuit is doing a fantastic job (at last) of innovating and doing what it needs to do to keep market share.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Dropbox wants to stretch desktop file storage to infinity

Dropbox has a futuristic vision for how its users will be able to share massive files and have quick access to them on their computers, without their hard drives overflowing.

The cloud storage company announced a new initiative at its Open conference in London on Tuesday called Project Infinite. It’s a push to create a new Dropbox interface that allows users to see all of the files they’ve stored in the cloud in their computer’s file explorer without requiring them to keep local copies of each document, image, spreadsheet or other file. 

With Project Infinite, users will be able to manage their files in the cloud by moving them around inside the Mac OS X Finder or Windows File Explorer, just like they would any local files that are taking up space on their hard drives.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

San Francisco wants Uber and Lyft drivers to get business permits

The City and County of San Francisco launched another salvo in the ongoing regulatory tussle between the city’s government and ridesharing services Uber and Lyft. This time, though, it’s the drivers who will have to pay up.

According to SFGate, San Francisco City Treasurer Jose Cisneros wants Uber and Lyft drivers who operate within the city to register for a business permit in order to continue driving for the ridesharing companies. The city plans to send letters to over 37,000 drivers to inform them of the requirement.

The requirement will extend to “Lyft and Uber drivers who work in the city seven or more days a year,” SFGate notes. A business permit starts at $ 91.

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CIO Cloud Computing

This little robot wants to help you shop

SoftBank’s Pepper robot may still be the better-known contender, but a new humanoid device from Hitachi aims to be the in-store sales rep of the future.

Called EMIEW3, the roughly 3-foot-tall unit can determine when customers need help and then approach them autonomously, Hitachi said on Friday. Using what it calls “remote brain” technology, the company developed the robot with customer service in mind for use in stores and other public venues.

EMIEW3 is actually the latest iteration in a series following Hitachi’s introduction of the original EMIEW back in 2005. EMIEW2, announced in 2007, featured capabilities such as the ability to move at a brisk human walking pace and to distinguish the human voice from background noise.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

This little robot wants to help you shop

SoftBank’s Pepper robot may still be the better-known contender, but a new humanoid device from Hitachi aims to be the in-store sales rep of the future.

Called EMIEW3, the roughly 3-foot-tall unit can determine when customers need help and then approach them autonomously, Hitachi said on Friday. Using what it calls “remote brain” technology, the company developed the robot with customer service in mind for use in stores and other public venues.

EMIEW3 is actually the latest iteration in a series following Hitachi’s introduction of the original EMIEW back in 2005. EMIEW2, announced in 2007, featured capabilities such as the ability to move at a brisk human walking pace and to distinguish the human voice from background noise.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Why Microsoft wants to help developers build bots

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is pushing developers to create virtual assistants and intelligent chatbots to help users do everything from managing their calendars to booking hotel reservations.

To that end, Microsoft has published a new Bot Framework, which makes it easier to build chatbots using either C# or Node.js. Working with the tools isn’t so easy that anyone could do it, but they can help reduce some of the difficulties of conversing with a computer.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Oracle wants to put its public cloud behind your firewall

Public clouds may promise a world of potential benefits, but for companies grappling with data sovereignty and other issues, the risks can loom large. Hoping to ease such concerns, Oracle launched a product on Thursday that effectively puts its public cloud behind the enterprise firewall.

Called Oracle Cloud at Customer, the new suite lets companies tap the Oracle Cloud as a fully managed service within their data center, giving them full control.

“We bring in a cloud machine, which is basically a replica of our public cloud services, and install it at the customer site,” said Amit Zavery, senior vice president for the Oracle Cloud Platform, in an interview on Tuesday. “Customers can get the infrastructure, the database, all the public cloud services, but behind the firewall.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Chef wants to de-risk the DevOps workflow

Chef is riding an important wave in enterprise IT. A wave that sees organizations move away from thinking about physical servers as items to be primped and preened and rather toward a Google-like model where servers are simply a unit of measure, to be used, abused and discarded once no longer needed. This theme of “infrastructure as code” is an important part of enabling a far more agile model of IT.

Chef isn’t alone in this space. Archrival Puppet is a company with a similar vintage, a similar story and a similar target audience. Ansible, a younger company in the same space, was acquired by Red Hat last year, and while Docker and Kubernetes may have stolen some thunder in terms of early-adopter excitement and attention, it’s fair to say that moving to automation on a server level is still a key concern for many CIOs and CTOs.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Amazon wants to eat enterprise IT alive

Of the ton of stuff announced at AWS re:Invent last week, my favorite item is a plain gray box called AWS Import/Export Snowball which is, to my knowledge, the first hardware ever offered by the world’s largest cloud provider.

Amazon calls it a “data transport appliance,” but it’s really a secure box of hard drives that holds up to 50TB. Just dump your data (for your Redshift data warehouse or whatever) into Snowball and ship it to Amazon via UPS — the quickest, cheapest way to upload that many bits to the cloud.

Snowball is a metaphor for AWS’s ambition to devour enterprise IT one large bite at a time. So is the new AWS Database Migration Service, announced in the same breath by AWS senior vice president Andy Jassy. All that data goes one way, from your house to his, and AWS has plenty of capacity to crunch on it — a staggering 10 times that of its nearest 14 public cloud competitors, according to the latest Gartner estimate.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Amazon wants companies to get onto its cloud using new services

Amazon Web Services has been at the forefront of the migration to the public cloud for years now, and is still pushing more businesses to leave on-premises workloads behind. But there’s a difficulty in all that: What about all those companies that have massive amounts of data tied up in on-premises servers and proprietary database formats?

The company addressed that Wednesday with a set of new announcements at its AWS Re:Invent conference in Las Vegas that were all aimed at helping companies get into the cloud. The most surprising of all of them is a new Snowball storage appliance that gives companies a secure way to ship massive amounts of data to Amazon’s cloud.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing