Monitor cloud services for compliance, security from a single view

Moving to the cloud is supposed to reduce the headaches for IT administrators, but often it has the opposite effect of increasing their workload, especially around security and visibility. Not only do they have to make sure on-premises systems adhere to regulatory compliance, but that their cloud services do as well.

Security specialist Qualys addresses these issues of security and visibility with its new app framework, CloudView, which complements existing Qualys services for security, compliance and threat intelligence with real-time monitoring of all enterprise cloud services from a single dashboard.

+ Also on Network World: 18 free cloud storage options +

“Accelerated cloud adoption requires new adaptive security solutions that support fast-moving digital transformation efforts,” said Philippe Courtot, Qualys CEO, in a statement. “Our new CloudView and its apps add unparalleled visibility and continuous security of all cloud workloads to provide customers complete cloud security in a single, integrated platform and drastically reduce their spend.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Google finally gains traction in cloud services

Google has long run a distant third behind Amazon and Microsoft in the cloud services business, but it finally seems to be catching some momentum, if the most recent quarter is an indicator of future trajectory. 

During an earnings call with Wall Street analysts, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said that Google Cloud Platform continues to experience “impressive growth across products, sectors and geographies and increasingly with large enterprise customers in regulated sectors.” 

To be more specific, Pichai said Google closed three times as many $ 500,000-plus deals in the most recent quarter as it did in the same time period last year. Of course, that is kind of pointless without knowing the exact number. And given Alphabet, Google’s parent company, reported overall revenue of $ 25.8 billion for the quarter, it’s likely a few drops in the bucket. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Amazon Web Services sets a lure for Java programmers

Amazon Web Services has long offered an SDK to make it easier to access its web services from Java. Now it has another lure for Java programmers: James Gosling, the father of Java.

Gosling revealed his new employer on his Facebook page with the words: “It’s time for a change. I’m leaving Boeing Defense (nee Liquid Robotics), with many fond memories. Today I start a new Adventure at Amazon Web Services.”

james gosling joins aws IDG News Service

On May 22, 2017, James Gosling announced on his Facebook page that he is joining Amazon Web Services.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

3 tricks to better manage your public cloud services

Some people call them “cloud hacks,” which is perhaps more accurate than “cloud tricks,” but the enterprises I work with don’t like the term “hack.”

Whatever you prefer to call them, here are three shortcuts you can create to achieve specific end states.

Cloud trick No. 1: Customize your console

Both Amazon Web Services and Microsoft have consoles that provide a master control view of resources on their clouds. With them, you can see what’s available and what you have already provisioned.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: How to get the most out of data, services in a multi-cloud world

There’s no doubt that we’re quickly moving toward a multi-cloud-dominated world. By the end of 2018, over half of enterprise-class businesses will subscribe to more than five different public cloud services.1 The pragmatic reality for the vast majority of enterprises is that their IT, and thus their data and services, will span multiple data centers and computing clouds. This will accelerate fragmentation of data and systems that have to be seamlessly integrated to yield their full potential.

Despite the benefits promised by public cloud, most enterprises can’t realistically move all their data off premises for various reasons—because data sets are too large to move in bulk or because of other preventative regulatory, privacy or security requirements, for example.  

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing