10 considerations for running WebRTC services on AWS

This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter’s approach.

You want to embed real-time communications features into your website or mobile application for direct peer-to-peer communication and you’ve landed on WebRTC. That’s a great start.

Now you realize that backend services are critical for building a robust solution. You are thinking about hosting your solution in the cloud, using an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) environment built on top of Amazon Web Services (AWS). Again, good choice. AWS is an obvious first place to look as they’re a leader in the cloud services space.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft commits to running data centers off 50% renewable energy by 2018

Microsoft announced it plans to power its data centers around the world using 50% renewable energy by 2018.

The company also plans to boost its use of renewable power for its data centers to 60% by the early 2020s.

Rob Bernard, Microsoft’s chief environmental & cities strategist, made the announcement at the VERGE16 conference last week.

Bernard’s comments during a conference keynote were a reiteration of a commitment earlier this year by the company to increase its use of clean energy.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Gain access to an ARM server running Linux OS, through the cloud

If you want to play with an ARM-based server, you can now apply to gain access to one online through the Linaro Developer Cloud.

The cloud service was announced in March but has finally gone live. It’s mainly targeted at developers who want to evaluate ARM servers.

The free service is one way to access ARM servers, which aren’t widely available. Applications go through an approval process, and only those serious about programming for ARM servers will likely be approved.

Developers will get remote access to bare-metal servers with ARM processors. Linaro has said servers will have ARM-based chips from Qualcomm, Cavium, and Huawei, and users will be able to select specific hardware.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Amazon cuts cost of running Oracle’s database in its cloud

Amazon Web Services now lets companies run Oracle’s database for about 3 cents per hour, while at the same time adding more options for enterprises that want to move high-performance workloads to the cloud.

The offering that makes this possible is Amazon RDS (Relational Database Service), which aims to offer cheap and resizable capacity, and take over many database administration tasks.

The last two months have seen Amazon step up its efforts to make RDS and its cloud a viable option for running databases. Improvements include using SQL Server Enterprise Edition without buying separate licenses, the general availability of its own MySQL-compatible Aurora database, and an increase of the maximum database storage size.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing