IDG Contributor Network: When to use a public or private cloud infrastructure

With the vast quantities of data generated daily and the complexities of the required processing escalating, the cloud is emerging as a forerunner in the computing domain. Reducing operational costs and improving analytical power, there is little doubt that cloud computing is the way to go to optimize organizational business intelligence.

The question, though, arises with regard to which platform to select. There are three platforms to keep in mind – private, public and hybrid clouds – and each is designed for specific targets depending on the type of data being used, and the level of security and management required. Depending on particular business needs and intricacy, different platforms are suited and different questions should be asked.

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: When to use a public or private cloud infrastructure

With the vast quantities of data generated daily and the complexities of the required processing escalating, the cloud is emerging as a forerunner in the computing domain. Reducing operational costs and improving analytical power, there is little doubt that cloud computing is the way to go to optimize organizational business intelligence.

The question, though, arises with regard to which platform to select. There are three platforms to keep in mind – private, public and hybrid clouds – and each is designed for specific targets depending on the type of data being used, and the level of security and management required. Depending on particular business needs and intricacy, different platforms are suited and different questions should be asked.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Public cloud: Real-world lessons of strategic success

The commodity days of the cloud are over. It’s time to get strategic. That’s the message of today’s leading cloud strategies, as forward-thinking CIOs are no longer turning to the public cloud to cut costs. Instead, the public cloud is viewed as an opportunity to get out of the business of managing data centers and focus on projects that are more strategic for the business.

Whether that means building a mobile app or new website to strengthen customer engagement, these shifts signal how strategic the public cloud has become for many companies. As a platform for running key business applications and services, the public cloud is a popular facilitator of digital transformations that enterprises are undertaking to boost bottom- and top-line growth.

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CIO Cloud Computing

3 tricks to better manage your public cloud services

Some people call them “cloud hacks,” which is perhaps more accurate than “cloud tricks,” but the enterprises I work with don’t like the term “hack.”

Whatever you prefer to call them, here are three shortcuts you can create to achieve specific end states.

Cloud trick No. 1: Customize your console

Both Amazon Web Services and Microsoft have consoles that provide a master control view of resources on their clouds. With them, you can see what’s available and what you have already provisioned.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Got big data? Go public cloud or go home.

The impact the cloud is having on big data and advanced analytics is shocking. We’ve hit a go public or go home situation – and while many enterprises I’ve spoken to about this migration are still on the fence, they understand they need to invest in more public cloud to engage with empowered customers. The problem is many are struggling with organizational momentum and regulatory issues that often manifest in technical objections that don’t hold water.

Public cloud was the number one priority for big data in 2016. Why? Because firms are running into a cost wall as they scale out their one premise infrastructures. They want to go bigger and faster and on premise configurations, including the on-premise portion of hybrid, but can’t keep the pace. The consensus in the industry is that hybrid is the best most can do – I disagree. Firms should have a public-first policy and rely on hybrid or on premise as interim measures only when necessary.

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CIO Cloud Computing

AWS wants to dominate beyond the public cloud with Lambda updates

Amazon Web Services’ big Re:Invent conference in Las Vegas brought a plethora of new features and upgrades to its cloud platform. But there was one key set of upgrades that set the stage for Amazon’s expansion outside its own public cloud data centers.

Two years ago, AWS CEO Andy Jassy made a big splash at Re:Invent when he introduced Lambda, a service that lets developers write snippets of code that execute in response to event triggers. Amazon does the work to provision servers to run that code, so developers don’t have to think about the infrastructure overhead.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Ricoh USA transforms ediscovery in the public cloud

For 80 years, Ricoh, the Japanese multinational that first saw light as Riken Sensitized Paper, has been known for manufacturing. But even with its long history, digital transformation hasn’t passed Ricoh by.

“While overall, we think of Ricoh as manufacturers for 80+ years, management of information has really been the focus of Ricoh for many years,” says David Greetham, vice president of eDiscovery, sales and operations for Ricoh USA, the company’s Malvern, Penn.-based North and South America arm.

Specializing in cameras and office electronics, Ricoh has manufactured copiers for Pitney-Bowes and Toshiba, Fax machines for AT&T and Omnifax, even the 8-bit processor used in the original Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Through the early 2000s, Ricoh grew to become the largest copier manufacturer in the world. It holds more than 46,000 patents for imaging and printing solutions, industrial products and digital cameras, and boasts 109,000 employees globally.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Cisco pits modular storage servers against public clouds

Cisco Systems is finding its way into storage through its successful server business. On Tuesday, the company introduced modular systems that can be deployed with different combinations of computing and storage capacity.

Though it’s not Cisco’s first foray into storage, the UCS S3260 Storage Server offers a density and a freedom of configuration that stands out against other systems, even competing on cost with public cloud services, the company says.

The server was announced at the Cisco Partner Summit in San Francisco. It’s the first entry in Cisco’s S-Series, a line of systems designed to serve both enterprises and companies that provide cloud services to others.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Which is cheaper: Public or private clouds?

It’s a debate that’s raged on for years: Which is cheaper, public or private clouds?

A new report from 451 Research finds that two of the most critical factors that influence the cost of a public versus a private cloud deployment are an organization’s ability to efficiently manage infrastructure and utilization of hardware resources. Generally speaking, if any organization has the expertise to manage a large number of servers at a high level of utilization then on-premises, customer-managed private clouds can have a total cost of ownership (TCO) advantage compared to public clouds. For smaller environments, or any sort of variable workload demand, public cloud is a more attractive financial option, 451 Research’s Director of Digital Economics Owen Rogers reports in “The Cloud Price Index: The great public vs private cloud debate.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Azure Stack TP2 Further Strengthens the Hybrid Azure Public / On-prem Environment

Azure Stack Technical Preview 2 (TP2) was announced at the Microsoft Ignite Conference at the end of September (2016), a MAJOR update from the TP1 release earlier this year focusing on extending the features and capabilities of Azure Stack as it progresses toward a formal release next year. 

A quick primer on what Azure Stack is for those reading up on Azure Stack for the first time.  In short, Azure Stack is Microsoft’s Azure public cloud environment that organizations can setup and run on-premise in their own datacenters.  Unlike something like Amazon Web Services that is a cloud-only solution where you have to import and export configurations and environments between your existing on-premise datacenter and AWS, Microsoft’s Azure Stack provides the same platform between the public cloud, hosted providers, and on-premise providers for the simplicity of building, configuring, and moving workloads between private and public clouds.  The Hybrid model of on-premise datacenters and public cloud services is a huge focus for enterprises that I covered in my initial February 2016 blog post introducing Azure Stack (http://www.networkworld.com/article/3037483/cloud-computing/truly-understanding-microsoft-s-azure-stack.html).

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Azure Stack TP2 Further Strengthens the Hybrid Azure Public / On-prem Environment

Azure Stack Technical Preview 2 (TP2) was announced at the Microsoft Ignite Conference at the end of September (2016), a MAJOR update from the TP1 release earlier this year focusing on extending the features and capabilities of Azure Stack as it progresses toward a formal release next year. 

A quick primer on what Azure Stack is for those reading up on Azure Stack for the first time.  In short, Azure Stack is Microsoft’s Azure public cloud environment that organizations can setup and run on-premise in their own datacenters.  Unlike something like Amazon Web Services that is a cloud-only solution where you have to import and export configurations and environments between your existing on-premise datacenter and AWS, Microsoft’s Azure Stack provides the same platform between the public cloud, hosted providers, and on-premise providers for the simplicity of building, configuring, and moving workloads between private and public clouds.  The Hybrid model of on-premise datacenters and public cloud services is a huge focus for enterprises that I covered in my initial February 2016 blog post introducing Azure Stack (http://www.networkworld.com/article/3037483/cloud-computing/truly-understanding-microsoft-s-azure-stack.html).

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Network World Cloud Computing

Bringing IoT data into public clouds is getting easier

The formidable processing power and analytical tools available in public clouds could make industrial IoT more effective and less expensive. But bringing IoT data into the cloud takes more than a network connection.

On Tuesday, two companies moved to help enterprises adapt their IoT data for popular cloud services. OSIsoft introduced its PI Integrator for Microsoft Azure, and Particle announced a custom integration with Google Cloud Platform.

While some large enterprises with sensitive IoT data do all their analytics in-house, public clouds offer greater scale and better security than many organizations can achieve on their own, MachNation analyst Dima Tokar said. More advanced analytics, including better error correction, in some cases can give enterprises the same insights with fewer sensors, he said. Trading hardware for software — especially the cloud-based kind — typically means savings.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Does Oracle have a shot in the public cloud vs. Amazon and Microsoft?

Larry Ellison has voiced fighting words at Oracle’s OpenWorld conference this week, announcing that Amazon Web Services’ lead in the IaaS market is over and that AWS will have “serious competition going forward.”

But does Oracle actually have a shot versus AWS and the company many see as the second place vendor, Microsoft?

“It depends,” says Gartner distinguished analyst Lydia Leong, author of the annual Magic Quadrant benchmark report for the public Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud market.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Oracle CEO Mark Hurd says he has the whole cloud stack +

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Network World Cloud Computing

New York Public Library reads up on the cloud

Four years ago, the New York Public Library began to move its web properties to the cloud.

Today, the library system has all of its approximately 80 web sites in the cloud. The library has shrunk the number of on-premise servers by 40% and is running those web properties 95% more cheaply than if it had bought the hardware and software to do it all by itself.

The library took a risk on the cloud, and on Amazon Web Services (AWS), and it paid off.

“We’ve grown but we’ve grown in the cloud,” said Jay Haque, director of DevOps and Enterprise Computing at the library. “Today, we’re primarily focused on the digital identity of the NYPL. How our properties look. How they merge and integrate. How our patrons use the site … Without the cloud, we wouldn’t have the time to focus on the customer experience.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Are There Workloads that Don’t Belong in the Public Cloud?

According to ESG research, 75% of organizations are currently using a public cloud service while another 19% have plans or interest in doing so (note: I am an ESG employee).  Furthermore, 56% of all public cloud-based workloads are considered IT production workloads while the remaining 44% are classified as non-production workloads (i.e. test, development, staging, etc.).

This trend has lots of traditional IT vendors somewhat worried, as well they should be.  Nevertheless, some IT veterans believe that there are limitations to this movement.  Yes, pedestrian workloads may move to the public cloud over the next few years but business-critical applications, key network-based business processes, and sensitive data should (and will) remain firmly planted in enterprise data centers now and forever.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Salesforce picks AWS as preferred public cloud provider

Salesforce named Amazon Web Services as its preferred public cloud provider for services like Sales Cloud, Service Cloud and App Cloud, expanding an existing partnership to provide the backend for the software-as-a-service provider.

AWS already hosts several Salesforce services like Heroku, SalesforceIQ and the recently announced IoT Cloud. This latest deal will help Salesforce to expand internationally without having to build its own data centers to comply with local data sovereignty laws. 

That’s important as Salesforce tries to pick up more customers in countries that have strict requirements about where data is stored. Salesforce isn’t the only company to turn to AWS in this capacity: Dropbox will store data with AWS in Germany starting later this year

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Salesforce picks AWS as preferred public cloud provider

Salesforce has named Amazon Web Services its preferred public cloud provider for services like Sales Cloud, Service Cloud and App Cloud, expanding an existing partnership to provide the backend for the software-as-a-service provider.

AWS already hosts several Salesforce services like Heroku, SalesforceIQ and the recently-announced IoT Cloud. This latest deal will help Salesforce to expand internationally without having to build its own data centers in order to comply with local data sovereignty laws. 

That’s important as Salesforce tries to pick up more customers in countries that have strict requirements about where data is stored. Salesforce isn’t the only company to turn to AWS in this capacity: Dropbox will store data with AWS in Germany starting later this year

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CIO Cloud Computing

AI, Public Data Sets, Real-Time: Strata + Hadoop Keynote Sampling

Strata + Hadoop keynotes included updates on the state of AI, new public data sets and programs from the US Department of Commerce, a closer look at what real-time data means for big data, and more. Here’s a sampling of some of our favorite keynotes from this week’s event.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Oracle wants to put its public cloud behind your firewall

Public clouds may promise a world of potential benefits, but for companies grappling with data sovereignty and other issues, the risks can loom large. Hoping to ease such concerns, Oracle launched a product on Thursday that effectively puts its public cloud behind the enterprise firewall.

Called Oracle Cloud at Customer, the new suite lets companies tap the Oracle Cloud as a fully managed service within their data center, giving them full control.

“We bring in a cloud machine, which is basically a replica of our public cloud services, and install it at the customer site,” said Amit Zavery, senior vice president for the Oracle Cloud Platform, in an interview on Tuesday. “Customers can get the infrastructure, the database, all the public cloud services, but behind the firewall.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Private, public, or hybrid: Microsoft’s cloud flavors

Every cloud in the sky is unique, as is every computing cloud. Microsoft has its own view of what its cloud is all about, what it’s made of, and the tools it provides to help connect Microsoft-powered private clouds with Microsoft Azure public clouds with service clouds (from third parties).

Having multiple options as to where your cloud services reside provides real agility should you need or want it.

But some organizations may not want it. For example, you may require complete control over your data and data compliance — for example, to satisfy regulations. In those cases, Microsoft’s options let you create a private cloud using Windows Server 2016 and Microsoft System Center.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Global public cloud market expected to hit $204B in 2016

The worldwide market for public cloud systems is projected to hit $ 204 billion this year, a 16.5% increase over the $ 175 billion market in 2015, according to analyst firm Gartner.

“The market for public cloud services is continuing to demonstrate high rates of growth across all markets and Gartner expects this to continue through 2017,” said Sid Nag, research director at Gartner, in a statement. “This strong growth continues to reflect a shift away from legacy IT services to cloud-based services, due to increased trend of organizations pursuing a digital business strategy.”

Given that IT budgets are growing at a rated of 1% to 3%, cloud services is one of the fastest growing segments of IT,” said Zeus Kerravala, an analyst with ZK Research. “Traditional packaged software is having about 3% growth, so cloud is five times that. The cloud just greatly simplifies IT but also enables businesses to move faster.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IT pros should focus on largest public cloud providers

The cloud has seen massive rates of adoption among IT professionals this year, and it will spread even deeper into entrenched industries over the next 16 months, according to a new report from Forrester Research. Despite ongoing consolidation, the research firm reports that the cloud vendor landscape is too crowded and IT professionals should increasingly hedge their bets on major public cloud providers such as Amazon, IBM and Microsoft.

CIOs and IT leaders should be wary of small, specialized players due to their narrow focus and the increased risks these companies carry around longevity and security, Forrester reports. The market research firm predicts there will be a significant decline in the number of players providing infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud services and management software by the end of 2016.

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Network World Cloud Computing

After fumbling public clouds, VMware focuses on hybrid clouds

From what company officials said this week at EMC VMware’s annual VMworld conference held in San Francisco, you’d think that its public cloud vCloud Air was in the same market tier as Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure. It’s not.

vCloud Air simply doesn’t come up in my conversations with organizations looking to move some, most, or all servers to the cloud. AWS and Azure do.

VMware’s hybrid capabilities

There’s no point to dwell on missing the public cloud infrastructure. Instead, it appears VMware will focus on the market where it currently has traction, meaning in the data center. Thus, what VMware described this week were hybrid capabilities in its cloud offerings to extend an organization’s data center to the public cloud without compromising security and compliance features.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Public cloud providers’ end game shouldn’t surprise anyone

In the beginning, public cloud was the only choice. If you had an existing environment on-premise, colocated or with another web hosting company, you couldn’t connect it up to the public cloud. You could set up your own site-to-site VPN across the internet, but this had […]

Public cloud providers’ end game shouldn’t surprise anyone originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

Beware hidden costs in public cloud adoption

Beware hidden costs in public cloud adoption
said the company considers public cloud services provided by vendors such as Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google to be "quite cost competitive". They are also "aggressively pursuing" SaaS, IaaS and platform-as-a-service (PaaS) offerings for a
Read more on ZDNet Asia

Cloud Services Firm Vazata Offers IaaS Platform to Colocation Customers
By Justin Lee, September 28, 2011 (WEB HOST INDUSTRY REVIEW) — Cloud computing services provider Vazata (www.vazata.com) announced on Wednesday it is offering its traditional colocation customers access to its Infrastructure as a Service platform
Read more on Web Host Industry Review (blog)

Intelliverse Introduces Partnership Program for Cloud Services in
An initial consultation will enable Intelliverse to develop a business model based on regional requirements, enabling Intelliverse to customize and localize its cloud services platform to suit specific needs. Intelliverse has been providing North
Read more on MarketWatch (press release)