Oracle refreshes entire SaaS line, aiming to fuel cloud momentum

As the migration of enterprises to the cloud picks up steam, Oracle is intent on keeping up. It has taken to refreshing its SaaS applications twice a year, bringing them up to feature parity with its on-premises software and adding brand-new features for e-commerce and internet-centric supply chain management.

Oracle Cloud Applications Release 13, announced Wednesday, is the newest iteration of the company’s cloud-based business applications. It upgrades the user interface across all the apps and delivers new capabilities for supply chain management (SCM), ERP, human capital management (HCM) and the CX Cloud Suite for customer experience management.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Oracle plans ‘startup organization’ focused on cloud computing, A.I. and VR

Oracle is hiring for a “new startup organization” inside its North America operation that will focus on key technology trends, including cloud computing, internet of things, artificial Intelligence, and augmented and virtual reality.

The Solution Engineering organization the company is setting up will consist of Solution Engineering Centers in Reston, Virginia, and Denver, Colorado.

The database and enterprise software company has previously indicated its interest in investing in some of these technology areas like machine learning and analytics.

Oracle announced in September that it was investing in intelligent cloud applications, called Adaptive Intelligent Applications, “that automatically offer individualized recommended actions and streamline the tasks of business users such as human resource or finance professionals.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle plans ‘startup organization’ focused on cloud computing, AI and VR

Oracle is hiring people for a “new startup organization” inside its North America operation that will focus on key technology trends, including cloud computing, internet of things, artificial Intelligence, and augmented and virtual reality.

The Solution Engineering organization the company is setting up will consist of Solution Engineering Centers in Reston, Virginia and Denver, Colorado.

The database and enterprise software company has previously indicated its interest in investing in some of these technology areas like machine learning and analytics.

It announced in September last year that it was investing in intelligent cloud applications, called Adaptive Intelligent Applications, “that automatically offer individualized recommended actions and streamline the tasks of business users such as human resource or finance professionals.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

On-premises HR users risk being left behind, Oracle says

Oracle is telling customers that the future of its HR platform will be in the cloud. It’s trying to do this without alarming users who host its applications internally.

Users of on-premises PeopleSoft and E-Business Suite HR system users won’t be abandoned as cloud use grows, Oracle promises. These systems will get regular updates and new features. There’s no end-of-life risk, said Mark Hurd, Oracle’s CEO. “No worries about that,” he said.

Even with that, however, Oracle’s cloud-basedHuman Capital Management (HCM) system will see many more new features and will pull ahead in capability over on-premises systems, said Hurd.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle promises IaaS growth as cloud business rises

Oracle’s third quarter financial results continue to show that the company’s future is in the cloud. On Wednesday, the company reported massive growth in its software- and platform-as-a-service businesses, promising further gains as its customers do away with their data centers.

The company’s SaaS and PaaS revenue from December 2016 through February 2017 was a little over $ 1 billion, up from $ 583 million during the same period a year prior. Its infrastructure-as-a-service business brought in $ 178 million during the same period, bringing the company’s total cloud revenue for the quarter to almost $ 1.2 billion.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle settles with ex-worker over alleged fiddling of cloud accounts

Oracle has informed a federal court that it is settling a lawsuit in which a former employee had charged that she had been terminated from her job for refusing to go along with accounting principles that she did not consider lawful.

In a joint submission Wednesday to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, lawyers for Oracle and the former employee, Svetlana Blackburn, asked to vacate a case management conference scheduled for Thursday, while submitting a notice of settlement to notify the court “that the lawsuit has been settled in principle, and to request thirty (30) days in which to file a dismissal.”

The lawsuit had drawn interest amid concern that companies could be dressing up their cloud revenue in a highly competitive environment. Gartner, for example, warned in December 2015, that “assessing vendor cloud revenue claims has become more challenging, with many vendors’ IT-related businesses being complicated and nuanced.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle bets Java EE future on REST APIs

Oracle is banking on REST and JSON to modernize Java EE for microservices and the cloud.

It may seem like ages since REST stole thunder from SOAP as a mechanism for providing web services communications. REST, in conjunction with JSON and HTTP, proved a far simpler means for delivering web services than SOAP, which has long been criticized for complexity.

Fast-forward to the present, and Oracle is now positioning REST and JSON as critical cogs in its Java EE upgrade plans. The company began retooling Java EE for microservices and cloud platforms last year, after community protests that Oracle had been neglecting the enterprise platform. The initial result of those plans, Java EE 8, is due this October.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Oracle is pricing itself out of Amazon’s cloud

Guess what? Oracle is raising prices again, this time on enterprises that choose to run Oracle software on Amazon Web Services.

Oracle’s previous licensing agreement recognized that an AWS virtual CPU is a single thread of a core that runs two threads. Therefore, each virtual CPU was counted as half a core.

But Oracle’s new cloud licensing policy says an AWS virtual CPU is now considered a full core unless hyperthreading is enabled. That doubles your cost for what you’ve been doing all along.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Oracle survey: Java EE users want REST, HTTP/2

In September and October, Oracle asked Java users to rank future Java EE enhancements by importance. The survey’s 1700 participants put REST services and HTTP/2 as top priorities, followed by Oauth and OpenID, eventing, and JSON-B (Java API for JSON Binding).

“REST (JAX-RS 2.1) and HTTP/2 (Servlet 4.0) have been voted as the two most important technologies surveyed, and together with JSON-B represent three of the top six technologies,” a report on the survey concludes. “Much of the new API work in these technologies for Java EE 8 is already complete. There is significant value in delivering Java EE 8 with these technologies, and the related JSON-P (JSON with Padding) updates, as soon as possible.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Oracle to buy DNS, cloud infrastructure provider Dyn

Oracle plans to acquire internet performance and DNS provider Dyn in an effort to pump up its cloud-based offerings and challenge infrastructure and platform service leaders like Amazon and Microsoft.

Dyn, in the news last month when it was targeted in a massive distributed denial-of-service attack, operates a global network that makes 40 billion traffic optimization decisions each day for more than 3,500 enterprise customers, including Netflix and Twitter.

Dyn monitors and optimizes internet applications and cloud services with the goal of delivering deliver faster access and reduced page-load times. Dyn’s services will give Oracle a one-stop shop for enterprise customers looking for infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) and platform-as-a-service (PaaS), Oracle said in a press release Monday.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Does Oracle have a shot in the public cloud vs. Amazon and Microsoft?

Larry Ellison has voiced fighting words at Oracle’s OpenWorld conference this week, announcing that Amazon Web Services’ lead in the IaaS market is over and that AWS will have “serious competition going forward.”

But does Oracle actually have a shot versus AWS and the company many see as the second place vendor, Microsoft?

“It depends,” says Gartner distinguished analyst Lydia Leong, author of the annual Magic Quadrant benchmark report for the public Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud market.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: Oracle CEO Mark Hurd says he has the whole cloud stack +

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Network World Cloud Computing

Oracle pushes hybrid by letting customers rent cloud hardware

One of the big issues facing public cloud vendors is persuading companies to take on-premises workloads and move them to a public cloud data center. 

Oracle is trying to enable that shift with a new set of products that allow customers to get the same hardware that Oracle runs in its data centers behind their own firewalls. Executive Chairman Larry Ellison unveiled the Big [email protected] and [email protected] machines on Sunday, building on the company’s [email protected] hardware offering.

It’s a move by the company to take advantage of Oracle’s expertise building hardware and combining it with software to reach customers as they’re in the process of migrating to the cloud. Ellison expects on-premises and cloud workloads will have to coexist for at least 10 years, he said.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle CEO Mark Hurd: We have the whole cloud stack

Few enterprise IT transformations can match the importance of today’s long migration from on-premises, client-server computing to cloud computing. This week at Oracle’s mammoth OpenWorld conference in San Francisco, Oracle will make it abundantly clear that it intends to become a leader in all three flavors of cloud — not only SaaS, where the company has already demonstrated strength, but also in PaaS and IaaS, where Oracle is a new player.

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