Microsoft introduces Azure Stack, its answer to OpenStack

Microsoft has taken the wraps off Azure Stack, its take on hybrid cloud infrastructure and response to the popular OpenStack open-source cloud computing package. Azure Stack will begin shipping in September.

Azure Stack was originally designed as a software-only product, much like OpenStack. But Microsoft has decided to add integrated hardware turnkey solutions from its certified partners such as Dell EMC, HPE, Lenovo, Cisco and Huawei.

Microsoft first announced Azure Stack at the Ignite Conference in 2015 and formally introduced it at the Inspire conference in Washington, D.C.

Azure Stack is basically the same APIs, tools and processes that power Azure, but it’s intended to be hosted on-premises in private cloud scenarios. By offering the same platform and tools both on-premises and in Azure, the company promises consistency and ease of deployment, whether it’s hosted locally or in the cloud.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft rumor: Company to reorganize cloud computing division

Multiple news outlets in Seattle and the tech press report that Microsoft plans to announce a significant reorganization in an effort to refocus its cloud computing division. In the process, a lot of people are going to lose their jobs.

The Seattle Times, Puget Sound Business Journal, Bloomberg and TechCrunch all cite sources claiming that the news could come this week, and that could mean layoffs in the thousands. 

The Seattle Times said it was unclear what groups would be affected and where they are located but that the move would be to get its sales teams to emphasize its cloud computing products instead of pushing packaged software. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft consolidates its mobile management tools under Azure

Microsoft has consolidated its Enterprise Mobility + Security (EMS) suite of products under its Azure portal, combining its Intune mobile application management tools and its Azure Active Directory (AD) and Information Protection under a single console.

The move offers a unified admin experience aimed at bolstering enterprise mobility management efforts.

Microsoft introduced the EMS suite in March 2014, targeting businesses with strong mobile and cloud-first strategies.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Going interstellar with Microsoft Cosmos

At Microsoft’s Build developer conference last week, the company announced Cosmos DB, a new cloud database offering that, if you believe the hype, entirely changed the database game. Before reelecting on what this means for developers and organizations, it’s worth taking a look at what Cosmos is.

Cosmos is a schema-free database service built with the aim of delivering high performance, fault tolerance, automatic indexing of data and truly globally distributed scalability. Cosmos is, at least in part, the evolution of Microsoft’s previous DocumentDB offering. DocumentDB was Redmond’s first foray into the NoSQL world. And while DocumentDB was a NoSQL choice in contrast to Microsoft’s relation offerings, Cosmos DB is multi-modal, offering developers the options to store relational or non-relational data. Scott Guthrie, Microsoft’s perennially red-shirted Executive Vice President of the Cloud and Enterprise group, described Cosmos as, “the first globally distributed, multi-model database service delivering turnkey global horizontal scale out with guaranteed uptime and millisecond latency at the 99th percentile.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Q&A: Microsoft Cosmos DB creator lays out vision for planet-scale database

Microsoft has fired a shot heard around the globe, so to speak, in data management with the debut of Azure Cosmos DB at the recent Microsoft Build 2017 developer conference in Seattle. The cloud database is positioned for elasticity and globally available data, supported on the Azure cloud. The project was founded in 2010 by Microsoft’s Dharma Shukla, who holds the title of distinguished engineer at the company.

InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill spoke with Shukla during the conference to get his perspectives on the technology.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Q&A: Microsoft Cosmos DB creator lays out vision for planet-scale database

Microsoft has fired a shot heard around the globe, so to speak, in data management with the debut of Azure Cosmos DB at the recent Microsoft Build 2017 developer conference in Seattle. The cloud database is positioned for elasticity and globally available data, supported on the Azure cloud. The project was founded in 2010 by Microsoft’s Dharma Shukla, who holds the title of distinguished engineer at the company.

InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill spoke with Shukla during the conference to get his perspectives on the technology.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Azure, AI, JavaScript headline Microsoft Build 2017

At its Build 2017 developer conference in Seattle this week, Microsoft will put its Azure cloud and Windows 10 front and center with sessions ranging from cloud services to artificial intelligence to programming languages.

The company will provide a road map for the Azure Compute platform and discuss how to use the cloud service for continuous delivery. Brendan Burns, co-founder of the Kubernetes container orchestration platform and the lead on Azure Container Services, will talk about containers redefining how reliable cloud systems are built, while another session will cover Windows Communication Foundation microservices in Windows containers for use on Azure. Build will also feature a session on linkage between the Node.js JavaScript platform and Azure.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Microsoft acquires Deis to boost its Kubernetes chops

Microsoft is acquiring Deis, a company that makes tools to work with the Kubernetes open-source container orchestration system. The deal, announced Monday, marks Microsoft’s continued interest in container orchestration.

Deis creates tools that aim to simplify the development of modern, containerized applications. Containers allow developers to write an application for an isolated, portable runtime that is supposed to be easily transferrable from a workstation to a server environment.

Tools like Deis’s Workflow, Helm, and Steward are supposed to ease the complex process of managing multi-container applications. They build on top of Kubernetes, the popular open-source container orchestration system that Google released to the world in 2014. Deis plans to continue its contributions to those tools as part of Microsoft, company CTO Gabe Monroy said in a blog post.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Here’s how Microsoft is helping companies build IoT hardware

One of the biggest challenges with building connected hardware is getting from proof-of-concept (PoC) prototypes to devices that are ready for large-scale production rollout. Microsoft is aiming to help through labs that allow companies to come in and work with experts on building internet-connected hardware.

Companies come into one of three Microsoft Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence (IoT/AI) Insider Labs with the hardware they’ve built so far and a plan for an intense two or three weeks of work. Visitors are paired with mentors who are experts in different areas and given access to machinery that can help them quickly work through different hardware designs.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

AWS, Microsoft and Google take different paths to the cloud

SAN FRANCISCO — An outage at Amazon Web Services Tuesday rekindled the debate about whether it is wise to rely too heavily on one cloud service provider. Such snafus are rare for AWS so CIOs worry more about the potential for vendors to turn off their service without notice.

But CIOs who bet on multiple providers often invite challenges, including committing resources to work with each vendor, said Adrian Cockcroft, vice president of cloud architecture strategy for Amazon Web Services, at this week’s WSJ CIO Network conference, which included also appearances from executives running Microsoft and Google’s cloud businesses.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

AWS, Microsoft, and Google take different paths to the cloud

An outage at Amazon Web Services Tuesday rekindled the debate about whether it is wise to rely too heavily on one cloud service provider. Such snafus are rare for AWS so CIOs worry more about the potential for vendors to turn off their service without notice.

But CIOs who bet on multiple providers often invite challenges, including committing resources to work with each vendor, said Adrian Cockcroft, vice president of cloud architecture strategy for Amazon Web Services, at this week’s WSJ CIO Network conference, which included also appearances from executives running Microsoft and Google’s cloud businesses.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing