Qualcomm awakens and hopes to crush Intel at its own game

Last Wednesday was historic for Qualcomm. In one day, the company jumped beyond its comfort zone of mobile chips and entered the PC and server markets.

With the expansion, Qualcomm now has chips for most computing products. It wants to outcompete even Intel, which dominates in PCs and servers but gave up on markets like smartphone CPUs earlier this year.

Qualcomm on Wednesday announced its Centriq 2400 server chips, which started shipping to test customers. Later that day, Microsoft revealed that first PCs based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 chip would come next year. The chip will also be used in high-end smartphones.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Intel refocusing itself, and its revenue stream, on cloud

With Intel looking to lock in on the next big thing and cloud continuing to grow in importance, it makes sense for the chip maker to seize on cloud computing as a way to transform itself.

That’s the word coming from industry analysts after Intel this week announced it will lay off 12,000 employees — or 11% of its global workforce — as it shifts focus from its traditional PC business to the Internet of Things (IoT) and the cloud.

With PCs seen as yesterday’s tech trend, Intel is betting its future on the growth of the cloud, which stores everything from music to corporate records and powers enterprise apps and billions of smart, connected devices.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Intel backs $100M funding round into OpenStack cloud

Looking to fuel enterprise adoption of the cloud, Intel is playing a lead role in a $ 100 million investment in an emerging player in the OpenStack arena.

Intel announced today it was leading a $ 100 million funding round for a collaboration with Mirantis Inc., a Mountain View, Calif.-based cloud computing company, to boost its work in enterprise OpenStack distribution and adoption.

“We hear a lot about OpenStack being ready for the enterprise, and in many cases OpenStack has provided incredible value to clouds running in enterprise data centers today,” wrote Jonathan Donaldson, a vice president at Intel in a blog post. “However, when talking to the IT managers who have led these deployment efforts, a few key topics arise: it’s too complex, its features don’t easily support traditional enterprise applications, and it took some time to optimize for deployment.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Apple, Intel cite gains in hiring women and minorities

Apple and Intel are both making progress in their efforts to hire more women and minorities, according to figures released by the companies this week.

In the first six months of the year, more than 43 percent of Intel’s hires in the U.S. were women and minorities, up from 32 percent at the end of 2014, the company reported in its first mid-year diversity report.

At 43 percent, Intel said it was surpassing the 40 percent diversity hiring goal it set for itself for the full year.

Apple, meanwhile, boosted its hiring of women by 65 percent globally over the past year, to 11,000, the company said in its second annual report.

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CIO Cloud Computing

The cloud is too hard, so Intel launched a sweeping project to fix it

Intel has kicked off a broad effort to speed the adoption of the modern cloud infrastructure, which it says has been slow to take off because the software is complex and takes too long to deploy.

“Most people look at the market and say ‘The cloud is on fire’,” Jason Waxman, head of Intel’s cloud infrastructure group, told reporters Thursday. “We’re in a position to say, ‘You know what? It’s not moving fast enough.'”

To speed its growth, Intel has kicked off a multi-pronged effort, called the Cloud for All initiative, that includes hiring hundreds of additional engineers to work on open-source cloud software, setting up two massive compute clusters where companies can test and validate applications, and making further investments and acquisitions itself.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing