Google’s new TPUs are here to accelerate AI training

Google has made another leap forward in the realm of machine learning hardware. The tech giant has begun deploying the second version of its Tensor Processing Unit, a specialized chip meant to accelerate machine learning applications, company CEO Sundar Pichai announced on Wednesday.

The new Cloud TPU sports several improvements over its predecessor. Most notably, it supports training machine learning algorithms in addition to processing the results from existing models. Each chip can provide 180 teraflops of processing for those tasks. Google is also able to network the chips together in sets of what are called TPU Pods that allow even greater computational gains.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Google’s Cloud Spanner melds transactional consistency, NoSQL scale

Earlier this year, Google offered a peek at Cloud Spanner, an automanaged database service that melds features from both conventional relational systems and NoSQL technologies.

Today, Google announced Cloud Spanner will be available to the general public later this month. It will compete not only with rival cloud databases, but also up-and-coming open source projects that address scale and reliability issues by using Google’s own ideas.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google’s Espresso networking tech takes SD-WAN to internet scale

Google is working to accelerate the performance of its applications over the internet by building out a software-defined network at broad scale. On Tuesday, the company announced Espresso, a system that provides increased network performance to users of the company’s applications.

It works by applying software-defined networking to the edge of the tech titan’s network, where Google connects to the peer networks of other internet service providers. Rather than rely on individual routers to figure out the best way to direct internet traffic, Espresso hands off that responsibility to servers running in the data centers that Google operates at the edge of its network.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Google’s secret weapon in cloud computing: people

SAN FRANCISCO – Google had several big tech and service announcements at this week’s second annual Google Cloud Next conference here. But the company is also leveraging a surprising resource to win enterprise customers – people.

It’s surprising because Google’s biggest successes have come from technology that pretty much sells itself, such as search and related advertising services like AdWords and AdSense.

But in those areas, Google succeeded because it was able to adroitly exploit its first mover advantage. In cloud computing, it trails the clear leader Amazon Web Services (AWS) and second-place Microsoft Azure. So at Cloud Next, the company did what smart competitors do: it unveiled new features and pricing designed to better position the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) as a worthy alternative.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Cloud and data center trends roundup 2016: Machine learning, hybrid cloud and Google’s enterprise ambitions

A decade on from the launch of Amazon Web Services (AWS), the cloud market is continuing to evolve quickly. What was once seen as a toy for test and development purposes now hosts mission-critical workloads for some of the largest companies in the world, while vendors work on the next generation of cloud services, such as those around machine learning.

Business demand clearly shows no sign of abating. Gartner claimed the overall cloud market was valued at $ 208.6 billion in 2016, amounting to a 17.2 percent increase from $ 178 billion the year before.

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CIO Cloud Computing

AI beating humans? Not in my lifetime, says Google’s cloud chief

The head of Google’s cloud business says she doesn’t expect machine intelligence to exceed that of humans during her lifetime, despite recent rapid progress that has surprised many.

Diane Greene, who turns 61 this year, said that while researchers are making strides in programming intelligence into computers, there’s still a long way to go.

“There is a lot that machine learning doesn’t do that humans can do really, really well,” she said on Tuesday at the Code Enterprise conference in San Francisco.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google’s cloud GPU undercuts, outperforms AWS, Microsoft

First came Amazon, offering GPU-powered instances in its cloud back in 2010. Then, more recently, Microsoft Azure and IBM Softlayer each provided their versions of the same, albeit with different pricing structures and instance types.

Who’s left? Take a guess.

Starting next year, Google will offer GPU instances for both Google Compute Engine and Google Cloud Machine Learning users, with GPU profiles that complement both high-end number-crunching and more modest remote workstation computation loads.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Could machine learning help Google’s cloud catch up to AWS and Azure?

Google has been offering public cloud services for several years now, but the company has continued to lag behind Amazon and Microsoft in customer growth. 

Under the leadership of VMware co-founder Diane Greene, who serves as the executive vice president of Google Cloud Enterprise, the tech titan has focused harder on forging partnerships and developing products to appeal to large customers. It has added a number of key customers under Greene’s tenure, including Spotify.  

One such win is Evernote, which announced Tuesday it would be migrating its service away from its private data centers and to Google’s public cloud. When Evernote was looking for a public cloud provider, the company was interested in not only the base level infrastructure available, but also high-level machine learning services and services for building machine learning-driven systems, said Anirban Kundu, Evernote’s CTO.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Bing Concierge appears to be Microsoft’s answer to Google’s conversational Assistant

CIO Cloud Computing

Apache Spark 2.0 Preview, Google’s Amazon Echo Rival: Big Data Roundup

Apache Spark 2.0 preview is released for Databricks customers. Google preps a stationary personal assistant like Amazon Echo. MarkLogic revs up security and encryption. We have all this and more in our Big Data Roundup for the week ending May 15, 2016.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Google’s cloud singing happy tunes after Spotify win

In case you missed it this week, a couple of the big cloud vendors had some big news this week.

Last month I explored why Google Cloud Platform hasn’t taken off in the market yet, and some of the cloudies I spoke with said the company should do a better job sharing customer success stories. Google seems to be doing that this week with announcements that Spotify has signed on to use the company’s cloud-based data analysis tools. Google also announced that retailer Spots Authority had signed on as a customer.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Google’s infrastructure czar predicts cloud business will outpace ads in 5 years

Google may lag behind its two biggest rivals in the public cloud, but Urs Hölzle, the technology titan’s senior vice president for technical infrastructure, sees Google’s cloud revenue eclipsing its ad business in five years.

“I think cloud will actually turn out to be a huge business because it’s a service business,” he said during an interview on stage at the Structure conference in San Francisco on Wednesday. 

Asked what he would say to enterprises that are skeptical about using Google’s cloud, Hölzle pointed to the company’s long track record providing enterprise services through its Apps productivity suite, and through the Google Search Appliance, which it’s been selling to enterprises since 2002. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google’s container management service exits beta, gets uptime guarantee

Google is the latest cloud service provider to rally behind containers, an emerging type of virtualization technology that adherents claim can streamline the process of running workloads in the cloud.

Google is now offering a container management service, called the Google Container Engine, for production workloads. This sets the stage for businesses to run their most important applications within containers on the Google Cloud Platform.

A growing number of organizations use containers as a way to build applications that can be easily scaled, duplicated and upgraded. The new service provides a way to manage large numbers of containers, eliminating a lot of the low-level work of orchestrating operations involving many containers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Google’s container management service exits beta, gets uptime guarantee

Google is the latest cloud service provider to rally behind containers, an emerging type of virtualization technology that adherents claim can streamline the process of running workloads in the cloud.

Google is now offering a container management service, called the Google Container Engine, for production workloads. This sets the stage for businesses to run their most important applications within containers on the Google Cloud Platform.

A growing number of organizations use containers as a way to build applications that can be easily scaled, duplicated and upgraded. The new service provides a way to manage large numbers of containers, eliminating a lot of the low-level work of orchestrating operations involving many containers.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Google’s Android Based Brillo Has the Potential to Take IoT Automation to Next Level

brillo1 300x155 Google’s Android Based Brillo Has the Potential to Take IoT Automation to Next LevelWith the acquisition of Nest last year, Google has demonstrated its interest in the field of smart home. At recently concluded Google I/O annual developer conference, the group of Mountain View celebrates a further step forward, talking openly about the Internet of Things.

Born Brillo, a project to connect any device used, not only smartphones, tablets, computers and smartwatch, but also those that are part of everyday life such as home appliances, cars, surveillance systems etc.

Brillo is the ecosystem through which Google intends to play a leading role in the IoT. It is a platform derived from Android, and reduced to essentials to be performed on devices with minimum system requirements, therefore, suitable to be fitted for example in lamps for smart intelligently manage the lighting system of the house. The strength of Brillo is the ability to recognize these devices in an entirely automatic way in smartphones and tablets, as well as simplify the configuration process, making it accessible even to beginners.

It will be able to connect devices of all kinds, through the use of sensors from the extremely low power consumption, enabling them to communicate with each other and enabling users to interact with it such as centralized refrigerators, equipment for monitoring of home, lighting and much more talking to each other.

In addition to home automation, Brillo is also designed for industrial use. Thus, a plant could, for example, use it to connect its sensors and manufacturing equipment.

Google’s another project Weave will be used as the cross-platform protocol, based on JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), through which developers can put in communication between their devices and objects compatible with Brillo, thereby taking advantage of the enormous potential of synchronization of cloud platforms and Mobile application versatility.

As regards the technical specifications, it seems that the software developed by Google can run on devices with a small quantity of RAM, even if only 32 or 64 MB. It supports Wi-Fi connectivity and Bluetooth low energy, does not require particularly powerful processors to run and the Thread protocol used by equipment designed by Nest, a Google property company specializing in intelligent thermal control systems.

Google Brillo IoT is based on a kernel that is derivative of the Android system; naturally it compact the bone to be unified with devices of very small size and devices not too capable on the hardware side. Given the market share of Android and the open source nature, Brillo has the potential to reach the same level as Android. The choice of keeping popular Android mobile OS caters especially to the simplification of procedures developed by device manufacturers.

One thing is sure – one linked to the Internet of Things is a new territory, but which have already staked their eyes for all big technology industries. Microsoft recently announced the arrival of a specially developed IoT version of the Window 10 operating system. Huawei has presented an IoT platform called LiteOS weighing just 10 kB and Samsung has already launched the chip design intended specifically for this sector.

The IoT will come soon in our lives every day without making too much noise with a number of interconnected devices that will grow dramatically in the coming years, and it is obvious that all the big names are getting ready to new market requirements.


CloudTimes

Homejoy’s loss could be Google’s gain

Homejoy, the at-home cleaning service that’s one of a new breed of startups serving as a broker of on-demand services, is shutting down, as companies in that category face legal challenges aimed at forcing them to classify freelancers as employees.

In an announcement on Homejoy’s site on Friday, CEO and co-founder Adora Cheung cited “unresolved challenges in the home services space.”

She did not specifically call out the worker classification issue. But a report in Re/code says the company was having difficulties raising additional funding amidst the concerns. Homejoy did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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CIO Cloud Computing