Cloud computing reversal: From ‘go away’ to ‘I can’t miss out’

Isaac Asimov once said, “I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them.” That quote has stuck with me to this day. There’s no doubt that computers and computing have changed our lives. Without them, we would be slaves to processes and paper.

I was reminded of Asimov’s quote when I saw the results of a recent poll done by Comvault of 100 IT leaders. More than two thirds said that they were worried about keeping up to date with the latest products and iterations across the major cloud providers. In other words, they fear missing out.

About a quarter (24 percent) of those polled said they were a cloud-only organization, which perhaps means they are very small or very new businesses. Additionally, 32 percent said they are cloud-first, with plans to become cloud-only, so they are likely mid-sized businesses. Also, 6 percent said they did not have a specific migration plan, which means they are BDCs (big dumb companies).

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Monitor cloud services for compliance, security from a single view

Moving to the cloud is supposed to reduce the headaches for IT administrators, but often it has the opposite effect of increasing their workload, especially around security and visibility. Not only do they have to make sure on-premises systems adhere to regulatory compliance, but that their cloud services do as well.

Security specialist Qualys addresses these issues of security and visibility with its new app framework, CloudView, which complements existing Qualys services for security, compliance and threat intelligence with real-time monitoring of all enterprise cloud services from a single dashboard.

+ Also on Network World: 18 free cloud storage options +

“Accelerated cloud adoption requires new adaptive security solutions that support fast-moving digital transformation efforts,” said Philippe Courtot, Qualys CEO, in a statement. “Our new CloudView and its apps add unparalleled visibility and continuous security of all cloud workloads to provide customers complete cloud security in a single, integrated platform and drastically reduce their spend.”

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Network World Cloud Computing

SAP wants enterprises to learn from their smart devices

SAP has added machine learning to its Leonardo IoT software suite to help businesses handle data gathered from smart devices more intelligently.

It unveiled the additions to Leonardo  — and a cloud of other news — at its customer conference, Sapphire Now, in Orlando on Tuesday.

Leonardo runs on SAP Cloud Platform and provides a number of services to process data from the internet of things, including streaming and predictive analytics. Now, those predictive capabilities will include machine-learning tools tuned to work with the rest of the Leonardo components.

“It’s about adding intelligence to existing business processes and integrating with the core systems of record. Leonardo’s capabilities can be infused into SAP applications,” said Mike Flannagan, SAP’s senior vice president for analytics. “We see Leonardo as something that will help customers transform processes.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: An under-pressure OpenStack gets support from an (in)famous individual

Last week saw a few thousand devoted OpenStack community members flock to Boston to take part in the bi-annual OpenStack Summit. This summit marks a major turning point for the initiative. Since we all congregated in Barcelona last year, there have been some major pieces of news which have rocked the community. Only a couple of weeks before the event, Intel pulled out of a partnership with Rackspace to build an OpenStack-based test facility, and OpenStack poster boy Mirantis pivoted from a pure OpenStack strategy to one covering a number of open source initiatives.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

How IBM wants to bring blockchain from Bitcoin to your data center

At its InterConnect conference in Las Vegas this week, IBM is announcing new features for its open source cloud-hosted blockchain service in an attempt to bring this distributed database technology from its initial use of powering Bitcoin to a broader market, including the financial services industry.

Blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continually growing list of records that can be verified using hashing techniques. Vendors such as IBM and Microsoft are attempting to commercialize it by offering customers a platform for hosting their own implementations. Analysts say the market to do so is just emerging.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: The future of networking is in a white box | How to get the most out of data and services in a multi-cloud world +

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CIO Cloud Computing

Microsoft’s Windows Server OS runs on ARM, with help from Qualcomm

Microsoft has warmed up to Qualcomm to make a Windows 10 PC based on its ARM chip, and now the companies are bringing Windows Server OS to ARM.

For the first time ever, Microsoft is expected to show the Windows Server OS running on an ARM server. The server runs on Qualcomm’s Centriq 2400, an ARM-based chip designed for cloud servers.

The server is being shown at the Open Project Compute Summit being held in Santa Clara, California, on Wednesday and Thursday.The ARM-based Windows Server hardware is for Microsoft’s internal use. No information was shared on when Windows Server would be available for ARM servers.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

5 lessons from Amazon’s S3 cloud blunder — and how to prepare for the next one

According to internet monitoring platform Catchpoint, Amazon Web Service’s Simple Storage Service (S3) experienced a three hour and 39 minute disruption on Tuesday that had cascading effects across other Amazon cloud services and many internet sites that rely on the popular cloud platform.

“S3 is like air in the cloud,” says Forrester analyst Dave Bartoletti; when it goes down many websites can’t breathe. But disruptions, errors and outages are a fact of life in the cloud. Bartoletti says there’s no reason to panic: “This is not a trend,” he notes. “S3 has been so reliable, so secure, it’s been the sort of crown jewel of Amazon’s cloud.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing