Oracle refreshes entire SaaS line, aiming to fuel cloud momentum

As the migration of enterprises to the cloud picks up steam, Oracle is intent on keeping up. It has taken to refreshing its SaaS applications twice a year, bringing them up to feature parity with its on-premises software and adding brand-new features for e-commerce and internet-centric supply chain management.

Oracle Cloud Applications Release 13, announced Wednesday, is the newest iteration of the company’s cloud-based business applications. It upgrades the user interface across all the apps and delivers new capabilities for supply chain management (SCM), ERP, human capital management (HCM) and the CX Cloud Suite for customer experience management.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Zoho’s latest pitch: Run your entire business for $1 a day per user

Zoho wants to be the operating system for your business. That’s how the company puts it, and what it means is that you can now get just about any application you need to run a business using Zoho One, which gathers all of Zoho’s applications for $ 30 a month per user.

Zoho One, announced and available Tuesday,  includes all 38 Zoho cloud-based applications, plus about a half dozen native apps as well more than 40 mobile apps. It offers centralized administrative control through an Admin Panel, which lets companies manage applications and define administrative groups as well as security and access privileges.

In the cloud era, the price of productivity applications in particular has come down. For example, Google offers G Suite applications for $ 5 per user a month. But Zoho’s applications span the spectrum of sales and marketing, including CRM; operations, including finance, recruiting and HR software; collaboration and productivity, including an office suite, email, and project management; and IT and help desk apps. Zoho also offers Creator, to build custom applications.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

That man who ‘deleted his entire company’ with a line of code? It was a hoax

The owner of a Web hosting company who claimed to have erased his entire business from the Internet with a single script command appears to have made the whole thing up.

Marco Marsala of Italy posted a cry for help on the popular Server Fault forum earlier this week, claiming he’d accidentally erased all the data on his servers including backups.

“I run a small hosting provider with more or less 1,535 customers and I use Ansible to automate some operations to be run on all servers,” Marsala wrote. “Last night I accidentally ran, on all servers, a Bash script with a rm -rf {foo}/{bar} with those variables undefined due to a bug in the code above this line.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

That man who ‘deleted his entire company’ with a line of code? It was a hoax

The owner of a Web hosting company who claimed to have erased his entire business from the Internet with a single script command appears to have made the whole thing up.

Marco Marsala of Italy posted a cry for help on the popular Server Fault forum earlier this week, claiming he’d accidentally erased all the data on his servers including backups.

“I run a small hosting provider with more or less 1,535 customers and I use Ansible to automate some operations to be run on all servers,” Marsala wrote. “Last night I accidentally ran, on all servers, a Bash script with a rm -rf {foo}/{bar} with those variables undefined due to a bug in the code above this line.

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Network World Cloud Computing

That man who ‘deleted his entire company’ with a line of code? It was a hoax

The owner of a Web hosting company who claimed to have erased his entire business from the Internet with a single script command appears to have made the whole thing up.

Marco Marsala of Italy posted a cry for help on the popular Server Fault forum earlier this week, claiming he’d accidentally erased all the data on his servers including backups.

“I run a small hosting provider with more or less 1,535 customers and I use Ansible to automate some operations to be run on all servers,” Marsala wrote. “Last night I accidentally ran, on all servers, a Bash script with a rm -rf {foo}/{bar} with those variables undefined due to a bug in the code above this line.

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CIO Cloud Computing

How hybrid will reshape the entire cloud market

Sinclair Schuller is the CEO and cofounder of Apprenda, a leader in enterprise Platform as a Service.

When the phrase “hybrid cloud” is mentioned, some technologists will tell you it is the eventual end state of cloud computing, while other technologists chuckle. Those that chuckle typically view hybrid as a phrase used by vendors and customers who have no cloud strategy at all. But hybrid is real and here to stay. Not only is it here to stay, but the hybrid cloud will also reshape cloud computing forever.

People today imagine public cloud to be an “amorphous, infinitely scalable computing ether.” They think moving to the cloud rids themselves of the need to detail with computing specificity and that cloud makes you location, risk and model independent. They think enterprises that move to the cloud no longer need to depend on pesky IT departments and deal with risks associated with centralized computing. This perception of computing independence and scale couldn’t be further from the truth.

The promise of cloud is one where anyone who needs compute and storage can get it in an available, as-needed, and robust manner. Cloud computing providers have perfected availability to the point where, even with occasional mass outages, they outperform the service-level agreements (SLAs) of internal IT departments. This does come at a cost, however.

Cloud computing is arguably the largest centralization of technology the world has ever seen and will see. For whatever reason, many people don’t immediately realize that the cloud is centralized, something that should be heavily scrutinized. Possibly because the marketing behind cloud can be vague and lacking a description of a tangible “place.” Don’t be fooled.

When an enterprise selects a cloud vendor, they’re committing to that provider in a meaningful way. As applications are built for or migrated to a cloud, switching cost gets very high. The nature of this market is driven by a network effect where, assuming all else is equal, each prospective customer of a cloud provider (AWS, Microsoft, etc.) benefits by consuming a cloud that has many of customers over one that has fewer since it indicates lower risk and helps drive the economies that make a given cloud attractive.

If we play this future out, we’ll likely see the cloud infrastructure market collapse to just a few massive, global providers. This will partly be driven by success of the individual providers and the consolidation of smaller players who have great technology but simply can’t compete at that scale. Just take a look at the acquisition of Virtustream by EMC just prior to Dell’s acquisition of EMC for a recent example.

A look at recent market share estimates show exactly that, with Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, and Google accounting for 50 percent of the global cloud infrastructure market. One day, these five vendors will likely account for 80 percent of the market. Compare that to the often-criticized banking world, where despite the massive size of today’s banks, the list of banks that hold 50 percent of global deposits is much longer than just five banks. If we applied the same standard to cloud computing, we’d certainly be infuriated and demanding that these “too big to fail” computing providers be broken up.

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that what’s happening is bad or that public cloud is bad, but rather to point out the realistic state of cloud computing and the risk created by centralizing control to just a few providers. Cloud would likely never have succeeded without a few key companies making massive bets. The idea of a truly decentralized, global cloud would likely have been the wrong starting point.

Let’s explore the idea that a global decentralized cloud, or something more decentralized than what we have now, is the likely end state. Breaking up cloud providers isn’t necessary or optimal. Unlike banking, technology is capable of layers of abstraction to mitigate these sorts of centralized risks.

Most large enterprises looking to adopt cloud are making two large considerations in their decision process:

  1. They can’t shut down their entire IT department and replace it with cloud. There are many practical reasons why this is unlikely.
  2. Many are keenly aware of the risks associated with depending on a single vendor for all their cloud computing needs.

The first consideration makes it difficult to adopt a public cloud without at least considering how to reconcile the differences with on-premises, and the second makes it difficult to choose one provider at a level that is incompatible with another provider. The result of centralization in public cloud providers and looking for symmetry between off- and on-premises computing strategies is driving enterprises to explore (and in some cases demand) hybrid capabilities in layers that abstract away infrastructure. In fact, hybrid has transformed to be synonymous with multi-cloud.

Technical layers like enterprise PaaS software platforms and Cloud Management Platforms have evolved to allow for multi-cloud capabilities to cater to a modality where resources are abstract. Over the coming years, we’ll likely see multi-cloud features in these technology layers to lead to a much more decentralized computing model where something like a PaaS layer will fuse resources from public clouds, on-premises infrastructure, and regional infrastructure providers into logical clouds.

At least in the enterprise space, “private clouds” will really be an amalgam of resources and will behave as the single, “amorphous ether” that we tend to assign cloud to begin with. The cloud market will not be one where five vendors control all the compute and customers are at the mercy of the vendors. Instead, cloud will be consumed through multi-cloud layers that will protect customers from inherent centralization risk. The end state is a decentralized model with control points owned by the customer through software – a drastic reshaping to say the least.

How hybrid will reshape the entire cloud market originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

Salesforce New Community Cloud Brings Big Data Analytics to Entire CRM

SalesforceCC 300x198 Salesforce New Community Cloud Brings Big Data Analytics to Entire CRMIt is not always easy for organizations to stay in touch with customers, partners and employees through home communities. With Salesforce’s new Community Cloud, companies can create their communities, in the LinkedIn style, but for their customers, partners and employees.

Built on the Salesforce Community Cloud Platform – via Connect API – companies can directly connect to Salesforce CRM and data sources and third-party systems. In this way, companies can deliver better service to their customers, more sales through partners and increase employee engagement. Salesforce research shows that digital communities guarantee 48 percent faster problem resolution, a 48 percent increase in employee engagement, 45 percent more customer satisfaction and 43 percent increase in sales through partners.

Community Cloud has a new feature called Targeted Recommendations which seeks to promote user engagement on these sites. The new feature, which is based on algorithms that analyze structured and unstructured data, is designed to bring members of the community the most relevant content, as inputs, resources, files and groups. The community managers can suggest content to specific information or an ad in the news and direct it to a group member type or a specific individual.

The second new feature now available is called Lightning Community Builder and Templates, and allows any business user community to deploy a customized, branded and optimized for mobile devices without the need to seek the help of IT. Companies can use Lightning Builder to create your own custom communities with custom applications. For example, a non-profit institution could build an application to organize volunteer events and incorporate it into the home page of your community.

Finally, Salesforce Connect for Google Drive Files is a new feature that allows community members to share any file created or stored in Google Drive. Thus, a marketing team could share a file from Google with the campaign planning group to easily access and work on it. You can also attach files within Google Drive to a record, as sales opportunities or service case.

According to IDC, the enterprise collaboration market was $ 1.24 billion in 2014, and the market expected to reach $ 3.5 billion in 2018, an annual growth of 23.1%. The sector as defined by IDC includes software for collaboration internally and externally. Other major players such as IBM Connections, Microsoft Yammer, Jive Software, Tibco Tibbr, Zimbra and SAP Jam also have a foot in this market.

Last year, Microsoft and Salesforce have signed a strategic partnership to create new solutions that will enable you to connect the platform and the CRM app to Windows and Office apps. The agreement provides that the Salesforce CRM solution is integrated with the Windows OS, the Azure cloud platform and the office suite Office 365.


CloudTimes

Oracle extends cloud suite to cover entire order-fulfillment process

Oracle took another step forward in its efforts to bolster its cloud offerings Monday with the launch of two new products designed to help companies conduct their entire order-fulfillment processes in the cloud.

Oracle Order Management Cloud and Oracle Global Order Promising Cloud are both extensions of the company’s Supply Chain Management Cloud and aim to provide modern order-management, visibility and fulfillment capabilities.

The new Order Management Cloud focuses on order capture and fulfillment with the goal of improving order handling. Among the potential benefits for users are centralized order monitoring and the ability to proactively manage order exceptions. Companies can also define, implement and maintain their own fulfillment policies without the need for technical programming tools, Oracle said.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing