3 open source projects that make Kubernetes easier

Clearly, Kubernetes is an elegant solution to an important problem. Kubernetes allows us to run containerized applications at scale without drowning in the details of balancing loads, networking containers, ensuring high availability for apps, or managing updates or rollbacks. So much complexity is hidden safely away. 

But using Kubernetes is not without its challenges. Getting up and running with Kubernetes takes some work, and many of the management and maintenance tasks around Kubernetes are downright thorny. 

As active as Kubernetes development is, we can’t expect the main project to solve every problem immediately. Fortunately, the community around Kubernetes is finding solutions to those problems that, for one reason or another, the Kubernetes team hasn’t zeroed in on. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Leave AWS? Not for easier cloud discounts

If the cloud is all about convenience, cloud pricing is anything but. The pay-as-you-go model has been complicated by AWS Reserved Instances and other ways to lock in lower prices at the expense of business agility. Indeed, this critical need to shepherd costs efficiently has some AWS users longing for simpler and more flexible pricing models – but not enough to switch to competing clouds that offer them.

Case in point: Google’s Sustained Use Discounts, which automatically kick in as your level of usage rises above 25, 50, and 75 percent of a given month. The greater the portion of the month you run your instance, the greater your effective discount.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Users’ orders: Make it easier to build hybrid clouds

A funny thing happened on the way to the hybrid cloud: Building the infrastructure was a pain in the neck.

That’s what enterprise IT people in the Open Networking User Group have discovered Last year, public cloud providers persuaded C-level executives to move significant corporate workloads to the cloud, but the tools weren’t there to make it work, said Nick Lippis, co-founder and co-chairman of ONUG.

“There is a ton of custom work that has to be done,” Lippis said.

So the user group, which includes IT executives from hundreds of enterprises, chose building hybrid cloud infrastructure as its focus for this year. It will be the main topic at ONUG Spring 2017, taking place next week in San Francisco.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Bringing IoT data into public clouds is getting easier

The formidable processing power and analytical tools available in public clouds could make industrial IoT more effective and less expensive. But bringing IoT data into the cloud takes more than a network connection.

On Tuesday, two companies moved to help enterprises adapt their IoT data for popular cloud services. OSIsoft introduced its PI Integrator for Microsoft Azure, and Particle announced a custom integration with Google Cloud Platform.

While some large enterprises with sensitive IoT data do all their analytics in-house, public clouds offer greater scale and better security than many organizations can achieve on their own, MachNation analyst Dima Tokar said. More advanced analytics, including better error correction, in some cases can give enterprises the same insights with fewer sensors, he said. Trading hardware for software — especially the cloud-based kind — typically means savings.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

PowerShell for Linux makes it easier to mix clients, servers and clouds

Microsoft’s key, .NET-based scripting and management framework is now open source and available for Linux (initially Ubuntu, RedHat and CentOS) and Mac OS, and both cloud and traditional infrastructure companies are stepping up to support it.

Open source, Linux and Mac OS announcements from Microsoft are becoming routine under CEO Satya Nadella, but making PowerShell fully open source and making it cross-platform is particularly significant — and not just because PowerShell for Linux is something that customers have been requesting for a long time.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Box Shuttle makes it easier to ditch on-prem file storage

Businesses that want to get their files out of on-premises data centers and into the cloud now have a new option from Box.

On Wednesday, the company launched Box Shuttle, an offering that includes tools and consulting services to help businesses move potentially terabytes of data from legacy applications into the Box cloud.

Box will work with customers to develop migration plans for getting their data out of private data centers into its cloud service. It will help figure out what content customers should keep, archive and delete.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

BrandPost: Why the Cloud Makes Your Job Easier

As a manufacturing technology professional, you’re responsible for a lot of mission critical processes in your business. Keeping systems up and running while fighting fires may be a regular part of the job, but it leaves you no time for strategic analysis into better, more efficient processes and systems. Cloud ERP changes all that. No longer do you need to spend the night at the office monitoring the plant floor and barely keeping up. The cloud makes your job easier while making you more valuable to your organization. Here’s how.

1. Mobility

Need to check inventory levels, equipment efficiency, or order status? With cloud technology, you simply log in on your mobile device to find out, anywhere, anytime. A mobile plant floor with cloud manufacturing ERP ensures that the top floor has relevant and timely information to make better decisions about your business.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Parse teams up with Heroku to make devs’ lives easier

Facebook’s cloud development platform, Parse, has partnered with Heroku to make it easier for developers to take advantage of both platforms’ capabilities.

Parse announced last month that it would now support Node.js alongside its own Cloud Code, which is based on the same V8 JavaScript engine. Partnering with Heroku is supposed to make it easier to bridge the gaps between the two.

“Developers choose Heroku because it gives the developer experience they deserve and allows them to focus on building great apps. Heroku’s elasticity makes it easy for for them to scale their apps to the needs of their business — whether a tiny Y Combinator startup or Macy’s,” says Heroku’s head of product for ecosystem Craig Kerstiens. “This new partnership and integration means they can combine those benefits with powerful SDKs from Parse. Whether you’re targeting mobile, embedded devices, or IOT, you’ve now got new choices on how to build them with Heroku and Parse together.”

Parse and Heroku are both popular amongst startups and large companies alike. Connecting the platforms could not only make life easier for cloud developers, but could also make both platforms more popular by virtue of cross-promotion.

“Parse and Heroku have similar goals — helping developers build great apps using the best cloud backend tools,” says Parse product manager Supratik Lahiri. “Because of this similar focus, our teams have been in touch for a while, and the conversation developed naturally. At Parse, we’ve been looking for ways to make Parse more open and flexible for developers and a Heroku integration was a great way to do that.”

Facebook acquired Parse in 2013, just two years after its debut. Wired characterized the deal as Facebook buying its way into the “heart of the app world” because so many developers relied on Parse for their mobile apps. It’s now used by everyone from Cisco and MTV to McDonald’s and Samsung.

Heroku was founded in 2007, and it’s used by many startups to build and deploy their Web apps. It was acquired by Salesforce, which spent an approximate $ 212 million on a startup that raised only $ 13 million in funding, so it could be “the cornerstone for the next generation of app developers.”

Parse teams up with Heroku to make devs’ lives easier originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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