Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Google, which has had to claw its way back into cloud relevance in the shadows of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, suddenly finds itself playing catchup again, thanks to the rise of serverless computing. Although Google Cloud Platform still trails AWS and Azure by a considerable margin in general cloud revenue, its strengths in AI and container infrastructure (Kubernetes) have given it a credible seat at the cloud table.

Or would, if the world weren’t quickly moving toward a serverless future.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Cloud computing reversal: From ‘go away’ to ‘I can’t miss out’

Isaac Asimov once said, “I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them.” That quote has stuck with me to this day. There’s no doubt that computers and computing have changed our lives. Without them, we would be slaves to processes and paper.

I was reminded of Asimov’s quote when I saw the results of a recent poll done by Comvault of 100 IT leaders. More than two thirds said that they were worried about keeping up to date with the latest products and iterations across the major cloud providers. In other words, they fear missing out.

About a quarter (24 percent) of those polled said they were a cloud-only organization, which perhaps means they are very small or very new businesses. Additionally, 32 percent said they are cloud-first, with plans to become cloud-only, so they are likely mid-sized businesses. Also, 6 percent said they did not have a specific migration plan, which means they are BDCs (big dumb companies).

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

No-latency edge computing will snowball

Edge computing, where processing takes place closer to the end user in order to reduce latency, among other things, is set to balloon, according to a researcher.

Mobile Edge Computing (MEC) will grow with a high compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of about 50.2 percent per year over the next few years (2016-2023), says Occams Business Research and Consulting, which published research in July.

Yet-to-be-launched 5G wireless networks and overall increasing use of data will be among the drivers. Global mobile data should reach 69 exabytes by the close of 2022, up from 8.9 exabytes in 2016, the report says.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft rumor: Company to reorganize cloud computing division

Multiple news outlets in Seattle and the tech press report that Microsoft plans to announce a significant reorganization in an effort to refocus its cloud computing division. In the process, a lot of people are going to lose their jobs.

The Seattle Times, Puget Sound Business Journal, Bloomberg and TechCrunch all cite sources claiming that the news could come this week, and that could mean layoffs in the thousands. 

The Seattle Times said it was unclear what groups would be affected and where they are located but that the move would be to get its sales teams to emphasize its cloud computing products instead of pushing packaged software. 

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Network World Cloud Computing

IBM makes leap in quantum computing power

IBM has some new options for businesses wanting to experiment with quantum computing.

Quantum computers, when they become commercially available, are expected to vastly outperform conventional computers in a number of domains, including machine learning, cryptography and the optimization of business problems in the fields of logistics and risk analysis.

Where conventional computers deal in ones and zeros (bits) the processors in quantum computers use qubits, which can simultaneously hold the values one and zero. This — to grossly oversimplify — allows a quantum computer with a 5-qubit processor to perform a calculation for 32 different input values at the same time.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: The difference between edge and cloud computing all CIO’s should know

The rise in cloud traffic that is expected as a result of increasing applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) might render cloud computing unmanageable. IoT hinges on processing device generated data and cloud computing involves using data from centralised computing and storage. Thus, this computational model can become overwhelmed if the growth trajectory of IoT continues as it has been.

The unprecedented amount of data generated by IoT devices is putting considerable strain on the internet architecture. Consequently, developers are finding ways to alleviate this network pressure and get around the data problem.

What is edge computing?

One of the proposed solutions to this issue is edge computing. This data processing archetype involves pushing data handling to the edge of the network, closer to the source of the data. In other words, instead of sending data to the cloud server or central data centre for processing, the device connects through a local gateway device. This allows faster analytics and reduces network pressure.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Serverless computing: Don’t make the wrong choices

Serverless computing is all the rage right now—and for several good reasons:

  • It removes you from having to provision a server yourself; you simply write functions, and the resources you need are automatically allocated to that function.
  • You pay only for the resources you use. No more leaving servers up and running, then getting a big cloud bill at the end of the month.
  • It can automatically scale, determining what cloud services need to scale with demand and then making it happen.

Amazon Web Services’ AWS Lambda and Microsoft’s Azure Functions are the best-known examples of serverless computing, and both have existed for a few years. Still, although we’ve had some great success in some serverless areas, there are other serverless areas that need work.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Cloud computing has another killer quarter

To most people, Jeff Bezos’ Amazon is known as the company reshaping the way people buy everything from books to shoes to groceries. But the part of Amazon that is driving Bezos within shouting distance of becoming the world’s richest person doesn’t really sell anything, it rents computing power in the cloud.

The cloud is more profitable than e-tailing

As the New York Times put it on Thursday, “The profit Amazon can make on cloud-computing services is significantly bigger than in its retail sales, and that has helped turn the Seattle company from a consistent money-loser to a respectable moneymaker.”

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Network World Cloud

Oracle plans ‘startup organization’ focused on cloud computing, A.I. and VR

Oracle is hiring for a “new startup organization” inside its North America operation that will focus on key technology trends, including cloud computing, internet of things, artificial Intelligence, and augmented and virtual reality.

The Solution Engineering organization the company is setting up will consist of Solution Engineering Centers in Reston, Virginia, and Denver, Colorado.

The database and enterprise software company has previously indicated its interest in investing in some of these technology areas like machine learning and analytics.

Oracle announced in September that it was investing in intelligent cloud applications, called Adaptive Intelligent Applications, “that automatically offer individualized recommended actions and streamline the tasks of business users such as human resource or finance professionals.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Oracle plans ‘startup organization’ focused on cloud computing, AI and VR

Oracle is hiring people for a “new startup organization” inside its North America operation that will focus on key technology trends, including cloud computing, internet of things, artificial Intelligence, and augmented and virtual reality.

The Solution Engineering organization the company is setting up will consist of Solution Engineering Centers in Reston, Virginia and Denver, Colorado.

The database and enterprise software company has previously indicated its interest in investing in some of these technology areas like machine learning and analytics.

It announced in September last year that it was investing in intelligent cloud applications, called Adaptive Intelligent Applications, “that automatically offer individualized recommended actions and streamline the tasks of business users such as human resource or finance professionals.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Google’s secret weapon in cloud computing: people

SAN FRANCISCO – Google had several big tech and service announcements at this week’s second annual Google Cloud Next conference here. But the company is also leveraging a surprising resource to win enterprise customers – people.

It’s surprising because Google’s biggest successes have come from technology that pretty much sells itself, such as search and related advertising services like AdWords and AdSense.

But in those areas, Google succeeded because it was able to adroitly exploit its first mover advantage. In cloud computing, it trails the clear leader Amazon Web Services (AWS) and second-place Microsoft Azure. So at Cloud Next, the company did what smart competitors do: it unveiled new features and pricing designed to better position the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) as a worthy alternative.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Edge computing will blow away the cloud

SAN FRANCISCO — The ubiquitous cloud computing craze may not be long for this world if venture capitalist Peter Levine is right. The Andreessen Horowitz general partner said that as more computing capabilities move to so-called “edge” devices, including anything from driverless cars and drones to the boundless devices that make up the internet of things (IoT), the cloud will slowly evaporate.

“A large portion of computation that gets done in the cloud today will return to the edge,” said Levine at the Wall Street Journal’s CIO Network event here Tuesday.

Levine said the driverless car, whose 200-plus CPUs effectively make it a “data center on wheels,” is a prime example of an edge device whose computing capabilities must be self-contained. Levine said that an autonomous vehicle relying on the cloud fo

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Network World Cloud Computing

Trump’s TPP trade move a setback for cloud computing

On the heels of the news that President Trump has removed the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a massive trade deal that he blasted as a candidate, experts warned of the fallout for cloud-computing companies that have been advocating for policies to break down digital trade barriers that restrict the flow of data traffic across international boundaries.

At the annual State of the Net tech policy conference in Washington, the news was met with disappointment by a panel of experts, who said that the provisions of the TPP governing the activities of tech companies would have been an important step toward establishing international norms for trade in the digital age.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The pros and cons of serverless computing

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

2016’s top trends in enterprise computing: Containers, bots, AI, and more

It’s been a year of change in the enterprise software market. SaaS providers are fighting to compete with one another, machine learning is becoming a reality for businesses at a larger scale, and containers are growing in popularity.

Here are some of the top trends from 2016 that we’ll likely still be talking about next year.

Everybody’s a frenemy

As more and more companies adopt software-as-a-service products like Office 365, Slack, and Box, there is increasing pressure to collaborate for companies that compete with each another. After all, nobody wants to be stuck using a service that doesn’t work with the other critical systems they have.

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CIO Cloud Computing

6 trends that will shape cloud computing in 2017

Cloud computing has helped many enterprises transform themselves over the last five years, but experts agree that the market is entering something of a second wave, both for public cloud and private cloud services built and hosted in corporate datacenters. The cloud market will accelerate faster in 2017 as enterprises seek to gain efficiencies as they scale their compute resources to better serve customers, says Forrester Research in a new report.

“The No. 1 trend is here come the enterprises,” says Forrester analyst Dave Bartoletti, primary author of the research. “Enterprises with big budgets, data centers and complex applications are now looking at cloud as a viable place to run core business applications.” Forrester says the first wave of cloud computing was created by Amazon Web Services, which launched with a few simple compute and storage services in 2006. A decade later, AWS is operating at an $ 11 billion run rate.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

VMware CEO pledges cloud computing freedom

In what’s become something of an annual tradition, we talked with VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger at the outset of the virtualization leader’s VMworld 2016 conference. In this interview with Network World Senior Writer Brandon Butler and IDG Chief Content Officer John Gallant, Gelsinger shared the big news from the event, including new tools that make it easier for customers to build cross-cloud environments, as well as an expanded partnership with IBM. With finalization of the Dell/EMC merger just over the horizon, Gelsinger reassured VMware customers about the company’s independence but said the resources available from that powerful ally will put ‘turbochargers’ on VMware’s back. He discussed the state of the software-defined data center and where customers stand in the deployment of virtual networks.

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